Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Jumping to the Top of a Page.

Jumping to the Top of a Page

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 29, 2017)

5

Word doesn't have a built-in command to jump to the top of the current (or next) page. Instead, Word expects you to use the Go To command to make those sort of jumps. (Just press F5, select Page, then click on Next or Previous.) If you need to jump to the top of the current page quite often, this approach can quickly become tedious. Sounds like a perfect opportunity to use a macro!

The following VBA macro jumps to the top of the current page:

Sub TopOfThisPage()
    Selection.GoTo What:=wdGoToBookmark, Name:="\Page"
    Selection.MoveLeft Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1
End Sub

If you want to go to the top of the next page, simply change the MoveLeft method to the MoveRight method. The macro relies on the use of the \Page bookmark, which is built-in to Word.

Once the macro is created, you can assign it to a keyboard shortcut or add it to the Quick Access Toolbar.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the WordTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (13030) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Jumping to the Top of a Page.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 4 - 0?

2017-12-29 11:08:47

Aprile Morgan

Doesn't CTRL Home take you to top of page and CTRL End take you to bottom of page?


2014-03-24 06:18:58

Duncan

Another alternative (that works for me) is:
Ctrl-PgUp Ctrl-PgDn

Ctrl-PgUp takes to the top of the previous page; then Ctrl-PgDn brings you back to the top of your current page. Simples! as we now say in the UK.


2014-03-23 10:50:45

Surendera M Bhanot

Dear Micheal, if the document is one-page long what you say is correct. But for a multi page document <Ctrl+Home> will take you to the top of the document (top of page number 1) and not to the top of current page. And similarly, <Ctrl+End> will take you the botton of the last page of the document and not to the bottom of current page.


2014-03-22 19:40:39

Michael

I've never had any trouble getting to the top of any page, whether in a Word document or on a web age. Control + Home does it every time.
Admittedly that is only for the page you are on, but it is so simple to use.
Similarly of course Control + End takes you to the bottom of the page.


2014-03-22 12:20:21

Surendera M Bhanot

If you know the page number of which you want to go to the top, just press <Ctrl+g+n+Enter+Escape>
(where "n" [without quotes] is the number of the in digit, of which you want to go to top).


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