Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007 and 2010. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Understanding the Normalize Text Command.

Understanding the Normalize Text Command

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 18, 2016)

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In the process of doing some customizations to Word, Toya was looking through the list of commands that could be added to the Quick Access Toolbar. One of the commands is "Normalize Text." Toya can find next to nothing about this command, and hopes to understand more.

Good question, Toya. You are right that there is virtually nothing about this command available on the Web. So, we did a little detective work within Word itself to see if we could figure out more. We were able to come up with one other tidbit of information.

When you use the Customize dialog box (as you did), it is a great way to see all of the commands that are available within Word. It isn't terribly helpful on giving you information about what each command does, however. To do this, you need to pull up the Macros dialog box. Follow these steps:

  1. Display the Macros dialog box. (Easiest way is to just press Alt+F8.)
  2. Using the Macros In drop-down list, choose Word Commands.
  3. Scroll through the list of commands until you can see and select (click once) the NormalizeText command.

In the Description box (just under the Macros In drop-down list) you should see a very terse description of what the NormalizeText command does: "Make text consistent with the rest." This is the only clue—anywhere—that we could find as to what this command does.

Exactly what effect the command has, we can't tell. We created some documents and applied various formatting to paragraphs and characters. We then selected the text and executed the NormalizeText command. There was nothing that happened to any of the formatting.

Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that the consistency referenced in the description has nothing to do with formatting. It could also be very possible that the command has no effect in English, but instead is used for text in other languages. (There are all sorts of internal commands that Word uses, for instance, to work with Asian languages and others that don't rely on the Roman alphabet.)

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (11107) applies to Microsoft Word 2007 and 2010. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Understanding the Normalize Text Command.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is nine minus 5?

2015-01-23 00:10:03

K.Vee.Shanker.

While I understand the difficulties expressed by the commenters here on MS, I highlight the fact that this problem of Help (?) is pervasive. Take any reputed product and search in its Help Pages for executing routine tasks to the next level.Say, forwarding a message to another recipient or modifying its Subject line. I wouldn't be surprised if you don't find that information while all unrelated advanced task procedures are presented instead.

Truly,Customer Support of Service Providers is becoming more and more irritating nowadays!


2015-01-15 17:40:52

Rob

I agree with VV, back in the old days we had an included help file which described the program. I get so frustrated now when I as Word for help and am redirected to external webpages which are indirectly related to my problem. Why is it that when publishers earn excessive profits from a product that there is a point when they don't invest those profits into the product to maintain it's quality? A good product doesn't need millions spent making small improvements appear to be indispensable, a good product will sell itself due the quality. (apologies for the rant!).


2011-12-19 12:38:10

Susan

I agree with V.V. Sharma.

Thank you, Allen, for helping to make the post-2003 Word understandable. It is beyond me why the product developers found it necessary to render the program less user friendly, but thanks to you, we can all cope with and even thrive in the new environment.

Wishing you a happy, healthy and successful New Year!


2011-12-17 09:29:51

v v sarma

Till about 2003, Help for Microsoft Word and Excel was in English - English that all could follow. Help was also limited to the business on hand. F1 brought up the relevant topic instantly.

Then the 'wizards' seem to have invaded. Convoluted sentences that talk about, any and every topic, except what you are searching for. Try searching for help on automatically numbering a list, if you want proof. The funniest joke that MS plays now is, if you are searching for help in Word, it asks you to confirm whether you want help for Word, Excel and so on!!
That's why I find WordTips a great efforts. My sincere thanks to you.


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