Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Automatically Changing Tab Stops in the Footer.

Automatically Changing Tab Stops in the Footer

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 7, 2017)

2

Most of Chuck's documents have footers that have right-aligned information at the right margin. This information is aligned through the use of tab stops. (The footer contains information aligned to the left margin and to the right.) If Chuck changes the margins for the document, the footer no longer aligns at the right margin; it aligns at the old right margin (the one he changed). Chuck wonders if there is a way to have Word change the tab stops in his footer automatically whenever he changes the right margin for the document.

There are two ways that you can approach this problem. One way is to use a two-column, one-row table in your footer. Set the width of the table to 100% and make sure the information in the right-most cell is right aligned. When you later change the margins of the document, the table automatically adjusts width and your information is correctly aligned.

The other approach is to use "alignment tabs" for your footer information. Follow these general steps:

  1. Create your footer as you normally would, but don't set any tabs in the footer yet. (Just type the footer text.)
  2. Display the Design tab of the ribbon. (This tab is visible when you are working in the footer.)
  3. Click the Insert Alignment Tab tool, in the Position group. Word displays the Alignment Tab dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Alignment Tab dialog box.

  5. Specify that you want the tab alignment to be Right relative to the Margin.
  6. Specify a leader character, if desired.
  7. Click OK.

That's it; you've just set a tab stop at the right margin and it will adjust to match whatever your right margin setting may be.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (8516) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Automatically Changing Tab Stops in the Footer.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is two more than 4?

2016-08-02 21:41:20

Hamdaan

Would you please let me know'
1. how to set foot notes in the same row.
2. how to set the same fonts for all the footnotes different from the main text.
3. How to put period after each number of footnote.
how to type verses in a way that each line is of the same length and at the same time horizontally centralized. I tried to do this by pressing shift+enter but it could be done only for full length of the page.
When i reduce margin from right to left, the verses also move to right and they are not in the center of the page.

Accept thanks in advance.


2014-06-11 02:11:30

Pat

I want the footers on my facing pages to be lined up so that the page numbers are in line. The spacing is set for 1/2 inch from the bottom but it doesn't look the same on the pages.


When you set the alignment tab do you have to set it for each page? I want the even pages aligned left and the odd pages aligned right. Can you set it once for the entire document?


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