Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Using the Spike to Edit.

Using the Spike to Edit

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 10, 2015)

3

Word has a feature that allows you to collect groups of text and paste them in another location. It is different than the Clipboard, which allows you to work with only one item at a time. The Spike is named after an old-fashioned paper holder onto which people poked papers as they were done with them. To collect information in the Spike, simply select the text and press Ctrl+F3. This cuts the information from your document and places it in the Spike. You can continue this process, and Word will add all the selected text to what already exists in the Spike.

When you are ready to paste the information somewhere, simply press Ctrl+Shift+F3. All the information in the Spike (not just the last text you placed there) is deposited in your document at the insertion point. This action also erases everything in the Spike. If you want to paste the contents of the Spike without clearing it, you can follow these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point where you want the Spike contents pasted.
  2. Type spike.
  3. Press F3.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (13355) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Using the Spike to Edit.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 5 + 0?

2015-12-28 22:45:58

Karellen32

Forgot to mention: in Word 2016, if there is anything on the spike, typing "spike" brings up an auto-completion box which prompts you to press "Enter" to insert the contents, without having to use F3. (This does NOT empty the spike.)

Actually, the box pops up after typing only the first four letters...


2015-12-28 22:14:48

Karellen32

I've been using Word for eons and had never heard of this useful feature. Thank you so much for the info!


2015-03-03 17:16:28

V S Rawat

Hi Allen,

I am simply amazed on finding from you this gem of word. Having used word almost everyday for some 20 years, there still are such nuggets that are revealed by a genius like you.

Can't thank you enough.

It has made copying and pasting so easy. Previously, I had to copy 100s of things one by one and paste them in other doc one by one, now no need of other doc, just keep on copying from a single document to spike, and then paste to another doc in a single go.

It is superb. Increased my productivity so much.

Thanks again.
--
Rawat
India


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