Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Finding Missing Fonts.

Finding Missing Fonts

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 14, 2016)

2

Kevin has various old documents that contain formatting for fonts that his company no longer uses. He can list these fonts by using the font substitution tool, but he cannot always locate the fonts in the document using Find and Replace. Kevin wonders if there is a foolproof way of locating all instances of the missing fonts. He knows he could simply substitute the font automatically, but he needs to see where the font is used so he can determine which font should be used to replace it.

One option is to go ahead and use the font substitution tool to replace the old fonts with a new font that you know you don't use for any other purpose, such as Varsity, Vagabond, or one of the script fonts. You can then use the Find and Replace feature of Word to search for the new font, examine the context, and then make replacements as you deem appropriate.

You can also use the Styles and Formatting pane to examine any instances where that font is used, if you prefer. In the pane, have Word display all the formatting in use. Then look for any styles that utilize the replacement font. You can then use the tools in the pane to display the number of occurrences of the formatting and, if desired, apply a different style to those elements.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (12693) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Finding Missing Fonts.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 7 - 1?

2016-06-14 08:16:52

Jan

Can you provide an example of Missing Fonts and the steps for using the Font Substitution Tool and Styles Pane to replace the older fonts?


2014-09-23 17:08:02

Ted

I need to find all instances of a substituted font (so I can check that they look ok in the substituted font). There are seven missing fonts that Word substituted; I found one by accident. Then when I checked the font substitution box I learned of the other six. I need a way to find them.

The obvious first choice is to use Search to find the missing font. Doesn't find it. So I searched for the substitute font. Doesn't find it either. So I tried your suggestion of replacing the missing font with a known font. Doesn't find it either.

I'm stumped.


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