Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Formatting Currency.

Formatting Currency

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 31, 2018)

4

Those who are familiar with the rich formatting features of Excel may long for a way to format numbers in a Word table just as easily. For instance, you may have a column of numbers that you want to format as currency, complete with the dollar sign. Unfortunately, Word does not allow you to do this type of formatting directly.

There is a work-around, however. You can use a field to insert any number you want in any format you want. For instance, let's say you have the number 65.78, and you want it formatted as currency in a particular table cell. All you need to do is follow these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point in the table cell where the number will reside.
  2. Press Ctrl+F9 to insert a pair of field braces.
  3. Type the equal sign, followed by the number (65.78).
  4. Type a space, followed by \# and another space. This switch tells Word that you are about to specify the format for the number.
  5. Enter the format specification, in quote marks. In this case, you would enter "$#,###.00".
  6. Press Shift+F9 to collapse the completed field.

You can continue to insert numbers in this way. If you have quite a few of them, you may want to create a macro to automate the process. Entering numbers in this way will not affect your ability to create column totals, as well.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (11331) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Formatting Currency.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 9 - 0?

2020-06-17 16:29:55

Monty

In looking at this tip a second time I may be missing the point here because I don't understand why one would go to all the convoluted nonsense to make an entry this way, which is fixed and cannot be changed without editing the field, rather than just entering the number with a $ in front.

I would like to be able to have a form with a table where I can enter a different number in the various cells, formatted as currency, each time I use the document, and have the column summed. I know how to do this as a form field with legacy controls, and do it all the time, but it does mean using form protection which has its own issues. Surely there must be a way to do the same simple task with the new Controls found in the ribbon versions of Word.

I know Word is an MS product and therefore does some strange things with newer versions that are often not improved, just new, as compared to a previous version of the product. The ribbon itself being the most glaring example in my opinion.


2020-06-17 15:54:03

Monty

I am not sure about the Shift F9 but pressing either just F9 or right clicking on the field and selecting "Update field" works for me on 2019 or 365 whatever I have.


2020-04-21 12:02:04

Kimberly

I am using 2019, and this solution is not working for me as well. I tried several times.


2020-03-01 11:26:25

FONTAINE

I am using the last version of Word most recent
and this solution is not working
I have tried several times
when I enter Shift+F9 everything is removed!
Can you help?


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