Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Word in Microsoft 365. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Squeezing Everything In.

Squeezing Everything In

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 17, 2021)

2

You've finished your masterpiece, and you are ready to "go to press" (even if the press is a small printer in the corner of your work area). You take a look at the document, and notice that it is a certain number of pages long. You go to the last page and find that there are only two lines or so on the final page. If you could just get rid of those lines...

This is a common problem for many writers. It doesn't matter if you are writing letters or novellas—the problem of fitting text to a specific print area can be frustrating. What can you do?

The best approach is the old tried-and-true manual method of adjusting the parameters that affect the text on your pages. The first thing you should try has to do with the content of your document itself. Don't be afraid to take another look at your content and edit it to make it shorter. Remove superfluous words and strive to be more concise in your descriptions.

Next, you can hyphenate your document. This can close up some lines, simply by pulling "partial" words up to previous lines. This works particularly well if the right side of your document is quite ragged, meaning it has a lot of white space.

Now you can look at adjusting the margins. You can often reduce margins on all four sides of your paper by .1 inch and no one will notice. Don't forget to examine the gutter margin, if your layout uses one.

Another thing to try is reducing the paragraph line spacing. You can set spacing to a specific number of points, but a "trickier" method is to set the line spacing to Multiple, and then use a percentage in the At box. For instance, set your line spacing to .99, and the paragraph then uses 99% of its normal line spacing. You can keep reducing the line spacing by a percent point at a time, and the incremental effect is barely noticeable to the reader. Even so, the effect on your document length can be dramatic, depending on the number of pages in the document.

A related trick is to reduce the space between paragraphs. Unfortunately, you can do this only in one-point increments, but the difference between 12 points and 11 points between paragraphs is minuscule and virtually undetectable.

When the above approaches have been used, it is time to reduce point size on your document's text. It is best to start out at small increments—Word can handle increments as small as one-half (.5) point. Thus, you could reduce from 12-point text to 11.5-point text. This is barely noticeable to a reader but can have a huge impact on document length.

Finally, you can condense character spacing. Here you can be quite precise, adjusting the spacing by as little as one-tenth (.1) point. Even a small adjustment here can significantly increase the amount of material on each line in your document.

As you can tell, there are quite a few different settings you can tinker with to get your document down to size. The drawback to this is that sometimes tinkering can lead to unintended results. For instance, you may end up with a document that looks funny because you applied your "fixes" sporadically throughout the document. A more consistent approach is to use styles to define the appearance of your text. Your "tinkering" can then be done to the styles themselves, and they will be applied evenly and consistently throughout your document. (Provided, of course, you applied styles consistently to begin with.) Styles are at the heart of any professional presentation of text in Word and have been covered extensively in other issues of WordTips.

The bottom line is to take a look at what you are trying to convey in your document, and then make the formatting changes that detract from your message the least. This means that an approach you take in one document may not be appropriate for another. You need to decide what is best for your purposes.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (10097) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Word in Microsoft 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Squeezing Everything In.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Understanding Views

Want to see how your document will look before it's printed? Or, do you want to see what things will look like if you put ...

Discover More

Leading Spaces in Document File Names

If you try to add spaces to the beginning of a document's file name, Word normally strips them away. This tip examines ...

Discover More

Dissecting a String

VBA is a versatile programming language. It is especially good at working with string data. Here are the different VBA ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

More WordTips (ribbon)

Formatting Page Numbers

Need to format the page numbers you added to your document? Word makes it easy, using the same techniques you use to ...

Discover More

Intelligent Title Case

A common editorial need is to change the capitalization used on different words in a selection of text. Word provides a ...

Discover More

Making Bottoms of Pages Line Up

Want to make your text look good on the finished page? This tip discusses a common speed bump in this quest--making the ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] (all 7 characters, in the sequence shown) in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is seven less than 7?

2021-08-11 12:03:53

Stig Wedel

In the above tip "Squeezing Everything In" you write: "Next, you can hyphenate your document. This can close up some lines, simply by pulling "partial" words up to previous lines. This works particularly well if the right side of your document is quite ragged, meaning it has a lot of white space." In the described situation with (some) paragraphs having a lot of white space at the end of lines, I have found that a more invisible solution than putting in hyphens is to select the paragraph(s) with lots of white space and then adjust the right indentation to a small negative amount, say -0.1 cm or -0.2 cm (or corresponding amounts in other units). This often results in a gain of one or two lines without having many lines ending in hyphens.

The technique also is very effective if a single paragraph ends with a line with just one short word. Often that extra line can be avoided through use of a small, negative right indentation if the other lines in the paragraph have a suitable mix of shorter words and white spaces close to the line changes.


2021-07-19 13:18:52

Steven Van Steenhuyse

Another way to do this is to use the "shrink one page" command. IIRC, in old versions of Word, this command was available on the Print Preview screen; in my version (Word 2013), it's not found unless you add it to the ribbon or the Quick Access Toolbar. Choose Options from the File tab, then "Customize Ribbon" or "Quick Access Toolbar." Pick "All Commands" from the "Choose commands from:" drop-down, then scroll all the way down until you find "Shrink One Page." Add it to the QAT or the ribbon tab of your choice. As far as I can tell, this tool does its work by slightly reducing the font and character spacing. Sometimes, reducing the font is not desirable, in which case the solution above to reduce line spacing by a miniscule amount may be a better solution.


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the ribbon interface (Word 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Videos
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.