Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Keeping a Picture Title with the Picture.

Keeping a Picture Title with the Picture

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 4, 2019)

3

Denis has a document that uses landscape orientation. He inserted a picture in the document and, following the picture, added the title for the picture. The title line was separated from the picture by one blank line and the title line was followed by one blank line. To ensure that the picture occupied as much of the page as possible without exceeding the page margins, Denis increased the picture size in Word until the final blank line disappeared from the page, and then he saved the file. (The final blank line overflowed onto the next page.)

When Denis reopened the file, the title curiously appeared on the following page rather than following the picture, as desired. When he repeated the sizing operation, although he can reduce the size of the picture by as much as fifty percent or more, he cannot get the title to move back to the same page as the picture.

It is most likely that this problem is caused by paragraph formatting. In order to see what is happening in Word, you'll want to turn on non-printing characters so you can see where the actual paragraph breaks are. (You turn on the display of non-printing characters by clicking the Show/Hide tool on the toolbar. When you do, you should see a backwards P character appear at the end of each paragraph. These don't print; they are purely for information.)

With the non-printing characters displayed and based on the description of the problem, you should see only two of the backwards P characters—one to the right of your picture and one to the right of your picture title. If you see any addition backwards P characters, delete them. This action alone may solve the problem.

If it does not solve the problem, then perform the following steps:

  1. Press Ctrl+A. This selects the entire document.
  2. Display the Home tab of the ribbon.
  3. Click the small icon at the bottom-right of the Paragraph group. Word displays the Paragraph dialog box.
  4. Make sure the Line and Page Breaks tab is displayed. (See Figure 1.)
  5. Figure 1. The Line and Page Breaks tab of the Paragraph dialog box.

  6. Make sure the Keep with Next check box is not selected.
  7. Make sure the Keep Lines Together check box is selected.
  8. Make sure the Page Break Before check box is not selected.
  9. Click OK.

Your picture and picture title should now stay together on the same page.

You may also want to consider modifying how you group your pictures and titles together. Some people find it handy to create a text box and size the text box so that it is as large as you want your picture to be. Then, insert the picture into the text box, press Enter once, and type your picture title. The picture and the title are, in this way, contained within a single text box. The benefit is that the text box is treated as a single unit by Word, allowing you to ensure that it remains on a single page.

Finally, you could always load your picture into a graphics program and add your title within that program. In this way the title becomes a part of the image itself and you wouldn't need to worry about trying to add the title within Word.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (9717) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Keeping a Picture Title with the Picture.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 7 - 4?

2019-01-05 14:06:59

Allan Poe

The simplest way I have found to keep a picture and it's caption together is to use the Snipping Tool to capture the picture and it's caption. This way you can place it ANYWHERE and it will always be the same. So simple!!!


2019-01-04 12:22:23

Henry Noble

When including a caption in the image file, add the caption after re-sizing the image to what you want in the Word document. Otherwise, the caption text will be re-sized if/when Word re-sizes the image.


2019-01-04 10:42:38

Steven J. Van Steenhuyse

Or, you can use the Caption feature to caption the picture, which creates a caption within a separate text box. Alternatively, you can create the title within a separate text box, if a numbered caption is not desired. With either process, you can use the alignment tools to get the title or caption just where you want it in relation to the picture; then, with both the picture and the text box selected, you can group them into a single drawing object. This will also keep everything together.


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