Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Creating Point Pages.

Creating Point Pages

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 21, 2015)

1

Larry works for a government contractor that produces very large documents—commonly hundreds or even thousands of pages. When they issue updates to the documents, it is done using "point pages." This means that if the update adds some pages between pages 42 and 43 of the existing document, then those pages are numbered as 42.1 and 42.2. Larry was wondering if there was a way in Word to create point pages and have the page numbering done correctly.

The only way to do this is to, within the document, insert a new section that will contain the point pages. The new section should be formatted so that it doesn't use the same header or footer (wherever you have the page numbers) as the previous section. In addition, the section following the point pages (the original document) will need to have its header or footer formatted to match the original formatting so that it doesn't continue the header or footer in the point pages.

In the new section—the one for the point pages—you can set up the header or footer to reflect the new numbering you want. For instance, you could define a footer that contained "Page 42." and follow this text with a page number. Start the page numbering for the section at 1, and you will end up with 42.1, 42.2, 42.3, etc. for all the pages in the new section.

In the section that follows the point pages, you'll need to configure the page numbers so that they start with whatever number they should begin with, such as page 43. This allows the page numbering to proceed as it should, until the next point pages section is reached.

You should note that this approach doesn't work well if you need to include any of the point pages in a TOC or an index. The reason is that Word doesn't see the "prefix" on the point pages ("42") as part of the page number; it only sees the restarted numbering. Thus, in the TOC or the index you would see 1, 2, 3 instead of 42.1, 42.2, or 42.3.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (8059) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Creating Point Pages.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Saving in a Macro Using a Desired File Name

Need to save a new document, from within a macro, to a specific file name? If you use the Record Macro capabilities of Word, ...

Discover More

Determining If a Number is Odd or Even

Need to know if a number in a macro is odd or even? It's easy to figure out with the simple calculation shown in this tip.

Discover More

Setting the Default Fill Color for a Shape to None

When you insert a shape into a worksheet, Excel does some preliminary formatting on that shape. You can subsequently make ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

More WordTips (ribbon)

Understanding Page Sizes

When you create a document, you need to be concerned about the final size of the page you will be creating. Word supports a ...

Discover More

Changing the Starting Page Number

Word normally numbers pages in a document starting at one and extending as far as the number of pages you have. If you want, ...

Discover More

Adding Page Numbers

Ever want to add page numbers to your document? Word allows you to control many aspects of page numbering. Here's how to add ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 6 + 0?

2015-02-23 08:44:27

Steve C

I thought that you could restart numbering in a new section; so in the example above in the "point section" you would re-start numbering at 42.1 using a Separator. Of course Same as Previous is turned off.

The once you left the "point section" and came back to the regular text, you would re-start numbering again, this time with 43. And again, Same as Previous is turned off.

Or am I just wishing for something that doesn't exist?


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the ribbon interface (Word 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.