Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Creating a Table of Authorities.

Creating a Table of Authorities

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 17, 2016)

2

In long legal documents, a table of authorities is often used to cite references to statutes, cases, and other sources for information referenced in the document. The table of authorities will cite the case or statute, along with the page number in the document on which the case or statute is referenced.

Word includes the ability to easily create a table of authorities. You do so by first marking citations within your document, and then instructing Word to compile the citations into your final table. (This tip deals specifically with marking citations, which is the basis of creating a table of authorities. Actually generating the table is covered in a different WordTip.)

As you are marking citations, you can specify both long and short versions of citations. For instance, a long citation may be something like "Smith v. Jones, 37 Adj. 3d 421 (1968)." The short version of the citation could be something like "Smith v. Jones" or even "Smith (1968)."

To mark citations, follow these steps:

  1. Select the long, full citation you want to use.
  2. Press Shift+Alt+I. Word displays the Mark Citation dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Mark Citation dialog box.

  4. Make any editorial changes desired to the text in the Selected Text box.
  5. Using the drop-down Category list, select the category to which this citation belongs.
  6. In the Short Citation box, edit the text to reflect the short version of the citation.
  7. Click on Mark (to mark just the current, selected instance of the citation) or Mark All (to search the document and mark all instances).
  8. Click on Cancel.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (5912) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Creating a Table of Authorities.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 8 - 2?

2016-12-17 18:51:49

Diamond

I have been using/teaching/supporting this feature since Word 97.

There are so many "gotchas" that I've abandoned its use and recommend CitationWare (or Best Authority).

1. "Mark All" can mark cites that should not be marked and miss cites that should be marked.

2. If you customize the ToA categories, those categories exist only on your pc. If you send the Word version to someone else and they update the ToA, Word uses the ToA categories on the other persons's pc.

3. Certain states (IL, AZ and OR) use a different format for the ToA:

The ToA supported by Word has the following format (for purposes of this post, I'll call it the federal ToA format):
- Cites are categorized (e.g, Cases, Statues, Other)
- Within each category the cites are alphabetized
- Each cite appears only once.

In a table of Points & Authorities (in IL, AZ and OR)
- Cites are not categorized. They are listed under Headings
(a/k/a points or arguments)
- Cites are not alphabetized; cites appear in order of
occurrence (or importance)
- Each cite appears under as many points (arguments) as they support

The workaround here is to use Heading (or other) styles for the Points and the Authorities. We enter cites in footnotes manually.

4. California uses the term "Table of Points and Authorities" but their format is the same one supported by Word -- the federal format.


2016-12-17 05:06:46

Jeff C.

This Tip is very concise and very helpful.


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