Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Replacing an X with a Check Mark.

Replacing an X with a Check Mark

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 10, 2015)

3

Cindi wants to use Find and Replace to replace a capital X with a check mark character. Specifically she wants to use the check mark character available in the Wingdings font. She's a bit unclear on how to do this type of replacing, however.

Actually, getting the results you want are relatively easy. There are several ways you can go about the task, but they all follow these general steps:

  1. Press Ctrl+H to display the Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.
  2. Click the More button, if it is available. The Find and Replace dialog box should expand. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

  4. In the Find What box enter an uppercase X.
  5. Make sure the Match Case check box is selected.
  6. Place the insertion point in the Replace With box.
  7. Click the Format button and then choose Font. Word displays the Font dialog box.
  8. In the Font list, select the Wingdings font.
  9. Click OK to close the Font dialog box. The insertion point should still be in the Replace With box, and the font specification you made should appear just under the box.
  10. Type the character you want to use for your check mark. (More on this in a moment.)
  11. Use the control buttons in the dialog box (Find Next, Replace, or Replace All) as desired to make your replacements.

This is fairly straightforward and should already be familiar to you. It is, after all, the basic method for doing most Find and Replace operations. The trick, however, is in how you do step 9. There are several ways you can specify the check mark character.

One way is to copy the check mark to the Clipboard before you start the steps. Just type the check mark into the document, as desired and then use Ctrl+C to copy it to the Clipboard. Then, in step 9, you can either press Ctrl+V to paste it into the Replace With box or you can use the ^c characters to tell Word you want to use the contents of the Clipboard as your replacement.

Another way to specify your check mark is to remember that all characters have underlying character codes that are understood by Word. If you can find out the character code for the check mark (it is available in the Symbol dialog box if you use that method of creating the check mark), then you can use the code in the Find and Replace dialog box.

In this case, the character code for the check mark is 252, which must be entered using four characters and a carat mark. Thus, you would enter ^0252 in the Replace With box. When you do the replacement, you'll see the check mark (which corresponds to the character code) appear in your document.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (13353) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Replacing an X with a Check Mark.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is eight more than 8?

2016-01-14 05:08:34

Ken Endacott

Here is a more elegant version of the macro and a second macro that inserts a red curly cross.

Sub InsertGreenTick()
Dim x As Long
Dim y As Long
x = Selection.Information(wdHorizontalPositionRelativeToPage) - 15
y = Selection.Information(wdVerticalPositionRelativeToPage) - 15
If x <= ActiveDocument.PageSetup.LeftMargin Then x = x - 15
With ActiveDocument.Shapes.AddTextbox _
(msoTextOrientationHorizontal, x, y, 30, 30)
.Line.Visible = False
.Select
Selection.Range.Select
Selection.InsertSymbol Font:="Wingdings", CharacterNumber:=-3844, Unicode:=True
Selection.TypeText Text:=" "
.TextFrame.TextRange.Font.Size = 30
.TextFrame.TextRange.Font.ColorIndex = wdGreen
End With
End Sub

Sub InsertRedCurlyCross()
Dim x As Long
Dim y As Long
x = Selection.Information(wdHorizontalPositionRelativeToPage) - 15
y = Selection.Information(wdVerticalPositionRelativeToPage) - 15
If x <= ActiveDocument.PageSetup.LeftMargin Then x = x - 15
With ActiveDocument.Shapes.AddTextbox _
(msoTextOrientationHorizontal, x, y, 30, 30)
.Line.Visible = False
.Select
Selection.Range.Select
Selection.InsertSymbol Font:="Wingdings", CharacterNumber:=-3845, Unicode:=True
Selection.TypeText Text:=" "
.TextFrame.TextRange.Font.Size = 30
.TextFrame.TextRange.Font.ColorIndex = wdRed
End With
End Sub


2016-01-13 10:43:11

Ken Endacott

Borka,
The following macro will place a green tick at the cursor position. The tick is in a borderless textbox that floats over the text and moves down the page if the associated text moves. Because it is floating it does not upset the page layout. The tick will be in the left or right border if the start or end of a line is selected.

The macro can be placed in the Quick Access Toolbar or can be allocated an accelerator key.

You might also want a second macro to place a red cross at the cursor. The Unicode number for a cross is -3845.

Sub GreenTick()
Dim aShape As Shape
Dim aRange As Range
Dim x As Long
Dim y As Long

Set aRange = Selection.Range.Duplicate
aRange.Collapse
aRange.MoveStart unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=-1
aRange.MoveEnd unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1
x = Selection.Information(wdHorizontalPositionRelativeToPage) - 10
y = Selection.Information(wdVerticalPositionRelativeToPage) - 10
If x <= ActiveDocument.PageSetup.LeftMargin Then x = x - 10

ActiveDocument.Shapes.AddTextbox Orientation:=msoTextOrientationHorizontal, _
Left:=x, Top:=y, Width:=30, Height:=30

Set aShape = aRange.ShapeRange(1)
aShape.Line.Visible = False
aShape.Select
With Selection
.Range.Select
.InsertSymbol Font:="Wingdings", CharacterNumber:=-3844, Unicode:=True
.Range.Paragraphs(1).Range.Select
.Font.Size = 20
.Font.ColorIndex = wdGreen
.Collapse Direction:=wdCollapseEnd
.TypeText Text:=" "
End With
aRange.Select
Selection.Collapse Direction:=wdCollapseEnd
End Sub


2016-01-12 11:00:55

Borka Richter

As a college professor, I spend a lot of time marking papers - along with many other teachers. Surely, there must be a way of inserting a tick (a checkmark) in Word documents, using a simple keyboard combination? This is, after all, a standard actions for education and is repeated many millions of times every day.
(I previously created a shortcut for a square root symbol - in Word 2013 this seems to be no longer possible.)


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