Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Word in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Jumping to Tables.

Jumping to Tables

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 3, 2021)

4

If you need to find tables within your documents, then there are a couple of ways you can approach the task. The first is to use the Go To command. Simply follow these steps:

  1. Press F5. Word displays the Go To tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.
  2. In the Go To What list (left side of the dialog box), choose Table. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Go To tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

  4. Click on Next to find the next table.
  5. Click on Previous to find the previous table.
  6. Click on Close when completed.

The other approach you can use is the Object Browser. Follow these steps if you are using Word 2007 or Word 2010. (The Object Browser was removed from Word 2013.)

  1. Click on the Select Browse Object button. It is located near the bottom of the vertical scroll bar and has a small round dot on it. A palette of objects appears.
  2. From the object palette, choose the Browse by Table option. It is the one located at the right side of the top row.
  3. Click on the Next arrows (the blue arrows pointing down) to find the next table.
  4. Click on the Previous arrows (the blue arrows pointing up) to find the previous table.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (13019) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Word in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Jumping to Tables.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 5 - 4?

2021-04-03 20:18:16

Rhonda

The loss of the Object Browse button was sorely felt by many who used it. However, some of its functions (e.g. jumping to next images [graphics] and tables) are available from the search function on the navigation pane. Ctrl+F to open the nav pane, then click the drop-down arrow to the right of the magnifying glass icon. Click one of the options in the Find section (e.g. tables), then click the next and previous arrows to quickly jump to that object.


2021-04-03 06:56:59

Ken Endacott

(see Figure 1 below)

Figure 1. 


2021-04-03 06:53:59

Ken Endacott

My apologies. The Browse command is not built in but was one that I had written some time ago and is installed on my computer. The browse functions are still available in VBA on the latter versions of Word but a macro is needed to use them.
Here are a couple of macros that can be placed on the QAT to jump to the next or previous table.
Sub BrowseNextTable()
With Application.Browser
.Target = wdBrowseTable
.Next
End With
End Sub

Sub BrowsePreviousTable()
With Application.Browser
.Target = wdBrowseTable
.Previous
End With
End Sub

My Browse command creates a floating form covering all the Browse options as shown below. The coding is too complex to describe in this forum.
{{fig}]


2021-04-03 05:10:23

Ken Endacott

In Word versions above 2010 the Object Browse Has been removed from the vertical scroll bar but it is still available and its new format it is more user friendly. However it is not installed on the ribbons or the QAT by default.

It can be added to a ribbon or the Quick Access Toolbar from “All Commands” and selecting “Browse”.


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