Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Saving Form Data for a Database.

Saving Form Data for a Database

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 20, 2015)

6

Word allows you to create forms into which users can enter data. Exactly how you create forms has been covered in other issues of WordTips. When users are done filling in the form, they typically save the form as a regular Word document.

If you want to later use the form data in a database, you may find this tip helpful. Follow these steps:

  1. Open the form document saved by a user.
  2. Display the Word Options dialog box. (In Word 2007 click the Office button and then click Word Options. In Word 2010 and Word 2013, click the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  3. Click Advanced at the left of the dialog box.
  4. Scroll through the options until you see the Preserve Fidelity when Sharing this Document section. (See Figure 1.)
  5. Figure 1. The advanced options of the Word Options dialog box.

  6. Make sure the Save Form Data as Delimited Text File check box is selected.
  7. Click on OK to dismiss the dialog box.

Now, when you go to save the document, Word presents you with the Save As dialog box, and the TXT file format is selected. Once you supply a file name and click on OK, Word extracts the form data the user typed in the document and saves it, in a comma-delimited format, in the TXT file. You can then use that TXT file to import the form values to a database program.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (8480) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Saving Form Data for a Database.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is one more than 2?

2017-09-11 19:07:49

Simon

Works for me. Thanks! Is there any way of getting the data out of multiple word files, without repeating this process each time? Thanks again


2017-02-24 19:23:26

Clarice Van Huizen

I'm having problem on my Word 2013. when i use layout-data-formula all I get is (=SUM(ABOVE)|#"#,##0.00") how do I fix this? Thanks


2016-12-07 17:47:01

Ross Martin

I had the same issue (blank results) and, reading on other sites, found that this method does not work with the new controls, but only with the legacy form fields. Try making your form with the older fields and see if you get a better result.


2016-05-18 04:44:36

Riana

Please can you help with this. I have the same problem as Kevin below:
"whenever I try this, the txt file is empty!"


2016-03-29 18:12:32

amy

Hi,
This is helpful, but I'm trying to extract form data to use in Excel in a different way. My Excel sheet isn't designed to compile data from multiple forms, but rather a single Excel sheet is designed to work with the data provided by a single word form. I'd like to extract specific fields from the word form and use them to populate specific cells of the Excel sheet. Is this something you can help with? If so, how can that happen?
Thank you,
Amy


2016-03-05 09:17:36

Kevan Keegan

whenever I try this, the txt file is empty! I've made forms that consist of only 3 rich text controls (Name, address, phone) and still no data!!
Note that I've tried this in word 2013 and word 2016


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