Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Best Quality for High Resolution Graphics.

Best Quality for High Resolution Graphics

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 1, 2015)

8

Nina is creating a letterhead, and she wants to use a graphic for the address portion of the letterhead. She saved the text portion out as an EPS vector file, thinking this would provide the best resolution when she inserted the graphic into Word. When she did that, however, the EPS file is treated in Word as if it is 72 dpi. This makes the original size of the graphic (according to Word) huge, something like 69 inches. Word automatically fits the image to the available space, which means it is resized to 11% of its original. The resulting graphic looks terrible in Word; the text in graphic format doesn't appear as crisp or sharp as the original text version of the address. Nina wonders what the best way is to embed a high-resolution graphic in her letterhead so that it appears with the crispness and clarity she expects.

There are several issues at play here. First of all, you may want to strongly consider not using EPS for your high-resolution graphics that will end up in a Word document. EPS is a vector format, meaning that a graphic file consists of many separate "objects" that are mathematically defined. Most programs, including Word, do not decode the math to the screen, but instead rely upon a low-resolution "preview" of the image. This preview is generated by the program that created the EPS file and it is typically at a low resolution, such as 72 dpi.

When you use Word to print the EPS file, what you see on the printout depends on the type of printer you are using. If you are using a PostScript printer (and the correct printer driver), then the EPS graphic will be printed correctly because PostScript is able to decode the EPS files correctly. If you are using a different type of printer—one that doesn't understand PostScript—or if you are using a non-PostScript printer driver with a PostScript printer, then what you see will be what you see on the screen—the low-resolution preview image for the EPS.

Since there are so many things that have to be "just right" in order for EPS files to work properly with Word, it is best to not rely on them unless you have to. Instead, choose to export your image to a high-resolution TIF format. Normally, for most printers, either 300 dpi or 600 dpi will work just fine. The resulting image file will be rather large, but it will be just as crisp and clear as you expect. The reason is that Word can work with TIF files and scale them to whatever size you need.

If the large file sizes are a problem, there are a couple of things you might try. First, export your image using a format such as PNG. It has great resolution, but the file sizes are much smaller than corresponding TIF files. You should also consider using a graphics program to resize the graphic to whatever final size you need in the Word document.

Another thing you will want to do is to configure Word so that it doesn't compress images. Word allows you to do this in Word 2010 and 2013:

  1. Display the Word Options dialog box. (Click the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. Click Advanced at the left side of the dialog box.
  3. Scroll down until you see the Image Size and Quality section. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The image settings in the Word Options dialog box.

  5. Make sure the Set Default Target Output control is set to 220 ppi.
  6. Click OK.

When you perform these steps, Word converts any high-resolution images to the resolution you specified in step 4. If 220 dpi is not sufficiently high-res for your needs, then you should (in step 4) click the Do Not Compress Images check box. When set, this causes Word to ignore whatever you have specified in the Set Default Target Output control and, instead, include any pasted images at their original resolution. This results in the highest resolution (provided your images are higher resolution than 220 dpi), but it also results in the largest document file sizes.

Finally, whatever format you decide upon for your graphics, you'll want to use the Picture tool on the Insert tab of the ribbon to actually insert the image into your document. If you paste the image instead of inserting it, Word may convert the image to a bitmap version that is not the greatest for some purposes.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (10218) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Best Quality for High Resolution Graphics.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 8 - 2?

2017-02-01 20:08:24

Handz

Hello. The best solution for this problem is using:

1. Click to Insert tab and click to Pictures button.
2. Select your image, and Insert button, click to down arrow.
3. Select Link to file.


2016-10-21 05:53:47

Gary

I'm running Word 2010 and it does not matter whether I follow these settings or not, Word still compresses the pictures to a lesser quality--often 96 dpi. Very frustrating.


2016-06-14 05:30:48

Terry

I'm running Word 2011 on Mac and having followed your tips (as far as I could, because on my version I couldn't find file>options>advanced)I've managed to set up a file with an overall background from an imported high res PNG file. However while the image appears to be perfect on my Mac, when transferred to either my PC (running Word 97, my client's PC (2016) and my daughter's PC(newish but don't know what)the image is 'fuzzy'. Could this be a Mac>PC problem or what?


2016-03-27 09:22:07

Lewis

My large MS Word doc has many graphics which I suspect will not translate to pdf well. My plan is to make into pdf and drop graphics into Acrobat. Is this a good idea? Thank you!


2016-01-11 11:31:34

alex

I have the new office 365 and there is no option to do that in the new word! So frustrating.


2015-08-26 05:07:41

Johann Swart

I have had very good results with WMF files, which is also vector based. My experience though is limited to monochrome images.


2015-08-25 09:37:58

Paul Franklin Stregevsky

TIF? Maybe in 1995. Use PNG to preserve fine details without bloating your file size. Your Word file will still be emailable.
For bitmaps, I'd paste the image as an Enhanced Windows Metafile.


2015-08-24 12:51:04

Dong

Hello

I cannot fine compress image box at Mac word 2011.

Further I insert pic at words , then let it auto convert into ePub, PDF AND KINDLE MOBI FILE. So want to know which format has best quality.

Thanks


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