Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Pasting a Comment into Your Document.

Pasting a Comment into Your Document

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 5, 2020)

3

Word includes a powerful tool that allows you to add comments to your document. Since comments are designed for reviewers' annotations while developing a document, it is handy to know how to paste the text of a comment into your main document. This is done using editing techniques you are already familiar with. Follow these steps:

  1. Make sure that the Reviewing Pane is visible at the bottom of your screen, or that the comment balloons are visible at the right side of your document.
  2. Select the text in the comment that you want to paste into your main document. Make sure you do not select the comment mark at the beginning of the comment or the paragraph mark at the end.
  3. Use Ctrl+X to cut the text or Ctrl+C to copy the text to the Clipboard.
  4. Position the insertion point at the place in your main document where you want the comment inserted.
  5. Press Ctrl+V to paste the text into the document.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (6036) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Pasting a Comment into Your Document.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Delaying in a Macro

At times, you may want your macro to pause execution. This tip presents four different ways you can add a delay into your ...

Discover More

Replacing Graphics with Graphics

You can use the Find and Replace feature of Word to replace inline graphics with other graphics. This tip explains how ...

Discover More

Turning Off Display of Zeros for All Worksheets

Some people like zero values displayed; others do not. Excel allows you to easily turn the display on or off for a single ...

Discover More

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

More WordTips (ribbon)

Viewing Comments

Adding comments to a document is a normal activity when writing and editing. Once comments have been added, you may ...

Discover More

Turning Off Comment Color when Printing

Comments that you add to your document are most often displayed in a bright color so they aren't easily missed. If you ...

Discover More

Searching for Comment Marks

Got a bunch of comments in your document? You can easily jump from one comment to the other by using the Object Browser, ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 5 - 3?

2020-06-05 17:12:09

Malcolm Patterson

If there is a way to move a comment, I don't know it. I don't find it to be a problem. I often decide to propose replacing a little more or a little less than originally intended (or to put the comment in a different place).

1. Copy everything in the comment (selected by mouse or with Ctrl+A, followed by Ctrl+C ).
2. Delete the comment (right-click, then D).
3. Select the new placement for the comment.
4. Initiate a new comment (Alt, R, C--but the old way still works: Alt+I, M)
5. Paste the contents of the clipboard to the new comment (Ctrl+V).
6. Edit the comment as necessary to suit the new location.

It seems like a large number of steps, but it's quick. I would welcome suggestions for a better way.


2020-06-05 16:37:31

Malcolm Patterson

I'd suggest that step 4 should be

Select the text to be replaced by what's on the clipboard or position the insertion point at the place in your main document where you want the clipboard text to be inserted.

One doesn't always want to insert the entire comment, which may include added text to support or explain the proposed change.

Common practice in our organization is to reserve markups for the correction of errors. Alternative language is proposed in comments instead of markup. This way, both the original and the alternative are readable at the same time. Typically, the reviewer making the comment will select exactly the text to be replaced before initiating the comment. This helps the author (and other reviewers) understand exactly what is proposed.


2020-06-05 07:08:18

Hazel K

Is it possible to move comments to a different part of the same document, rather than deleting from where it is and either re-typing or pasting into the new place?


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the ribbon interface (Word 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.