Adding an Inverted A

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 10, 2019)

In one of his Word documents Mike keeps a list of model kits on which he's worked. One of the anime kits he has completed is titled with an inverted (upside down) letter A. Mike wonders how he can invert the letter A in this title.

There are multiple ways that you can accomplish this task. You could, if desired, use WordArt or rotate the text in a text box. Both of these approaches have been covered in the tip named Upside-Down Printing.

The approaches detailed in that tip are best suited for larger selections of text. Mike, however, is dealing with a single letter. In this case, you can best solve the problem by relying on Unicode characters that will do the trick. Depending on the font you are using in your document, you might try either of these:

  • Type 2200 and immediately press Alt+X.
  • Type 2C6F and immediately press Alt+X.

You can see if your font supports an inverted A by displaying the Symbol dialog box (on the Insert tab of the ribbon click Symbol, in the Symbols group, and then click More Symbols). Using the Subset drop-down list, choose Glagolitic. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1. The Symbol dialog box.

You can see the inverted A in the table of available characters. At the bottom of the dialog box you can see the Unicode code for the character. It is this code that you can type and then immediately press Alt+X to display.

If you would like, you can find out how to insert an upside-down A or any other upside-down characters at this site:

http://www.upsidedowntext.com/

Speaking of other, helpful websites, the ShapeCatcher website can come in very handy:

http://shapecatcher.com/

The site allows you to draw the character you want. (For instance, I drew an upside-down A.) When you click on the Recognize link, the site tells you multiple ways to insert the character.

Another possibility is to install a special font to handle your upside-down character needs. You can do a search at any font site for "upside-down font" or "inverted font." Here are just a couple of possibilities:

https://fontzone.net/font-details/upsidedown
https://www.fontspace.com/category/upside-down

Which approach should you choose? Honestly, you should try several different methods and then stick with the approach that best fits your needs.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (13659) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Word in Office 365.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Understanding Background Saving

Word has the capability to save your work, in the background, while you continue to edit your documents. This tip ...

Discover More

Using a Single-Column Heading in a Multi-Column Layout

Want different numbers of columns all on the same page? Word makes it easy to use, for instance, a heading that uses a ...

Discover More

Easily Changing Links in Documents

You may have a lot of linked images in a document, and then one day need to change the links if the location of the ...

Discover More

The First and Last Word on Word! Bestselling For Dummies author Dan Gookin puts his usual fun and friendly candor back to work to show you how to navigate Word 2013. Spend more time working and less time trying to figure it all out! Check out Word 2013 For Dummies today!

More WordTips (ribbon)

Replacing Some Smart Quotes

Smart quotes look great in a document, but may not be right for all instances of quote marks or apostrophes. If you need ...

Discover More

Deleting Freezes Computer

Sometimes a strange object or text may appear in your document, as happened to Sharon. To complicate the situation, her ...

Discover More

Inserting Different Dashes

Dashes have a lot of different uses in writing. Word supports three types of dashes, as discussed in this tip.

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 6 + 8?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the ribbon interface (Word 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.