Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Determining How Many Styles are Available.

Determining How Many Styles are Available

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 2, 2014)

You can determine the number of styles available in a document (when creating a VBA macro) by using the Count property with the Styles object. This is done using the following syntax:

x = ActiveDocument.Styles.Count

where x is the variable you can then use in other VBA macro lines. Note that this function indicates how many have been defined, not how many of those are actually in use. This means that built-in styles are also counted. If you want to exclude built-in styles, you can do an actual iterative count of the styles in this manner:

x = 0
For Each objStyle in ActiveDocument.Styles
    If Not objStyle.BuiltIn Then x = x + 1
Next objStyle

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (13190) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Determining How Many Styles are Available.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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