Adding Common Line Spacing Options

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 25, 2017)

3

On the Home tab of the ribbon Valerie can use the Line and Paragraph Spacing tool (in the Paragraph group) to choose some standard line spacing options such as 1.0, 1.15, 1.5, etc. She would like to include some other line spacing options that she uses quite a lot, such as 1.2, 1.23, 1.25, etc. She wonders if there is a way to modify the options shown in the tool.

There is no way to modify the options available on that particular tool's drop-down list, at least not as far as I've been able to determine. However, there may be an easier way to accomplish your desire than to modify the tool—just use styles.

The whole idea behind styles is to consistently apply common formatting to your text. Thus, if you commonly want to have paragraphs that use 1.2 line spacing, you could create a style for that formatting need and apply it where you need it. Styles can also be associated with keyboard shortcuts, which means that you'd be able to apply them very quickly. If you prefer, you could also add your custom style to the Style Gallery that appears on the Home tab of the ribbon. (How you create styles, associate them with shortcut keys, and add them to the gallery has been covered in other issues of WordTips. Just do some judicious searching on the WordTips website and you'll find all the info you need.)

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (12912) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Inserting from the Clip Art Gallery Doesn't Work

Ever insert a picture and it won't display in your document? It could be due to some of the display settings in Word. ...

Discover More

Combining Multiple Rows in a Column

Do you need to concatenate the contents of a range of cells in the same column? Here's a formula and a handy macro to ...

Discover More

Adding Tags to Text

The Find and Replace capabilities of Word can be used to add HTML tags to your document text. This is easier to do than ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

More WordTips (ribbon)

Displaying Nonprinting Characters

Nonprinting characters are a great boon when you are editing a document. Turn them on and you can easily see what ...

Discover More

Getting Rid of the Paste Options Box

Paste something in a Word document, and you may notice a dynamic little set of options appear right next to what you ...

Discover More

Margins On the Screen Don't Match Printout

Does your text on the screen sometimes look "scrunched up" when it comes to the transition between pages? It could be a ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 0 + 4?

2016-08-08 19:09:23

Danielle

Thank you for the tip!

Searched "shortcuts for word styles" and found: http://wordribbon.tips.net/T005948_Assigning_a_Shortcut_Key_to_Styles.html

As a keyboard person (carpal tunnel), I really appreciate anything that you can do with the keyboard.

Another way to APPLY existing formatting to another part of the document is to highlight the portion with formatting that you want to copy(you can use Ctrl+Shift+Arrow to select).

Once highlighted, press Ctrl+Shift+C to copy the formatting.

Then to move to portion where you want to apply that formatting (does not have to be in the same document). Highlight the text and press Ctrl+Shift+V.

If you only want to apply spacing or paragraph style without changing the font itself (e.g., you have a section with tight paragraph spacing or an indented paragraph), don't actually SELECT any text; just place the cursor somewhere in the line or paragraph before pressing Ctrl+Shift+V. This will apply spacing only (Note: If you are copying formatting on a heading, it will change the font to that default heading style anyway, since headings are normally to be consistent).


2014-01-27 09:00:36

Jennifer Thomas

Here is a great article about line spacing, especially the reasons for using multiple, exact, and at least options (that new multiple 1.15 default in Word 2007+ caused some initial confusion in my world, and this was my source article for the answer).

http://compusavvy.wordpress.com/2010/08/01/understanding-line-and-paragraph-spacing-in-word/


2014-01-25 09:52:27

Tom

Also, in the paragraph formatting options box, you can go to the "Line spacing" drop down menu, choose "Exactly" and enter the number of points for your customized line spacing.


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the ribbon interface (Word 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.