Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Nudging a Table.

Nudging a Table

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 11, 2018)

1

Ray wonders if there is a way to move an entire Word table vertically, pixel by pixel. Everything he has read indicates that grabbing it and holding the Alt key will allow for that, but it does not work smoothly.

I'm not sure where Ray has been reading, but the Alt key does not allow for nudging tables. In fact, it doesn't seem to work for table movement at all, with one exception—if you press Shift+Alt and then use the up or down arrow keys, the table is moved up or down an entire paragraph in your document.

Other keystroke combinations don't work either. You would think that nudging tables would work as it does for other objects within a document—you select the object and then use the arrow keys to give the nudge. However, it doesn't work with tables at all. If you select the table and then press the up or down arrow keys, then Word deselects the table and moves the insertion point either above or below the table in the document.

There are a couple of workarounds you can use, however. First, you could adjust how you put your tables in the document. Simply put them within a text box, and then you can use the arrow keys to nudge the text box. (You can also format the border on the text box so it doesn't show.)

Another workaround is to use a macro to do the movement. The following macro will move the table a single pixel up:

Sub MoveTableUp1()
' set pxl to the number of pixels to move: positive for down and
'   negative for up
    Const pxl As Single = -1

    If Not Selection.Information(wdWithInTable) Then Exit Sub
    With Selection.Tables(1)
        .Rows.VerticalPosition = .Rows.VerticalPosition + PixelsToPoints(pxl)
    End With
End Sub

All you need to do is make sure that the insertion point is within the table you want to nudge. If you want to move the table down instead of up, simply change the definition of the pxl constant to be a positive 1 instead of a negative 1.

If you prefer, you can move the table a point (1/72 of an inch) at a time. Here's the version of the macro that could handle this movement:

Sub MoveTableUp2()
' set pt to the number of points to move: positive for down and
' negative for up
    Const pt As Single = -1

    If Not Selection.Information(wdWithInTable) Then Exit Sub
    With Selection.Tables(1)
        .Rows.VerticalPosition = .Rows.VerticalPosition + pt
    End With
End Sub

Nudging the table horizontally instead of vertically is simply of matter of using the HorizontalPosition property with the Rows object rather than the VerticalPosition property. You could rather easily create four versions of your macro (for each of the four directions you might want to nudge your table) and then assign shortcut keys to the macros.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the WordTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (12136) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Nudging a Table.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 3 + 2?

2018-08-11 07:25:37

Al Wilson

Sorry, but for me this macro does not work. Well, at least works in a strange way. The Macro for moving Up and Down actually move my table left and right, whereas my modified version using HosizontalPosition causes an error 9118 Parameter value was out of accepted range. This was when using pxl parameter as either 1 or -1. Basically no change to the macro other than changing VerticalPosition to HorizontalPosition.

Can't understand the issue unless it thinks my document is in Landscape mode (It is in portrait) but that would not explain the 9118 error.
I assume HorizontalPosition can be incremented or decremented by a Single of either 1 or -1?

Edit. Up and Down work correctly but using HorizontalPosition causes the error 9118. I am using Word 2016.


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