Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007 and 2010. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Changing What Is Pasted in a Dialog Box.

Changing What Is Pasted in a Dialog Box

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 23, 2015)

1

Ihor wants to automate the inserting of a URL hyperlink into a Word document. The URL will be associated with a phrase, such as "click here". He first copies the URL of a specific website to the Clipboard. He then records a macro that opens the Insert Hyperlink dialog box (Ctrl+K) and pastes into the appropriate field the URL from the Clipboard (Ctrl+V) and clicks OK. When he later runs the macro, it gives him the same URL every time he runs it. Ihor wants to paste a different URL into the dialog box every time he runs the macro, but seems to be missing how to do that.

When you record a macro, it is very literal about what it does—it records exactly the steps you take, including how dialog boxes are filled out. The solution isn't to look for ways to paste new information into a dialog box, but to look at how you are creating your hyperlink. Here's what would be recorded if you inserted a hyperlink with the macro recorder running:

Sub Macro1()
'
' Macro1 Macro
'
'
    ActiveDocument.Hyperlinks.Add Anchor:=Selection.Range, Address:= _
        "http://www.tips.net/", SubAddress:="", ScreenTip:="", TextToDisplay:= _
        "click here"
End Sub

What Ihor wants to change is the target for the hyperlink, which is assigned to the Address property; this is what gets "pasted" into the Address field of the dialog box. In order to do this, you could change your macro in a simple manner, such as this:

Sub Macro2()
    Dim sTemp As String
    sTemp = "http://www.tips.net/"

    ActiveDocument.Hyperlinks.Add Anchor:=Selection.Range, Address:= sTemp, _
        SubAddress:="", ScreenTip:="", TextToDisplay:= "click here"
End Sub

All that has been done in this example is delete some of the unnecessary comments at the beginning of the macro and create a string variable, sTemp, that now contains the target for the hyperlink. This variable is then assigned to the Address property. In order to change the target, then, one only needs to change the value of the sTemp variable—and there are a number of ways this can be done.

One way is to use an InputBox function to create your own dialog box, in this manner:

Sub Macro3()
    Dim sTemp As String
    Dim sPrompt As String
    Dim sTitle As String

    sPrompt = "Enter the target for the hyperlink"
    sTitle = "Hyperlink Destination"
    sTemp = "http://www.tips.net/"
    sTemp = InputBox(sPrompt, sTitle, sTemp)

    ActiveDocument.Hyperlinks.Add Anchor:=Selection.Range, Address:= sTemp, _
        SubAddress:="", ScreenTip:="", TextToDisplay:= "click here"
End Sub

Of course, Ihor mentioned that in his process he actually copies the URL to the Clipboard. If that is the process that he wants to use, it is possible to assign the URL based on whatever is in the Clipboard when the macro is run. Here's how you would do that:

Sub Macro4()
    Dim sTemp As String
    Dim MyData As DataObject
    Set MyData = New DataObject

    MyData.GetFromClipboard
    sTemp = Trim(MyData.GetText(1))

    ActiveDocument.Hyperlinks.Add Anchor:=Selection.Range, Address:= sTemp, _
        SubAddress:="", ScreenTip:="", TextToDisplay:= "click here"
End Sub

In order to utilize the Clipboard in this manner, you'll need to set up a reference for the Microsoft Forms in the VBA Editor. (Choose References from the Tools menu in the Editor.)

Note, as well, that all these examples modify what is assigned to the Address property of your new hyperlink. There is a good chance that you'll want to change the macro to modify what is assigned to the TextToDisplay property, as well.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (11906) applies to Microsoft Word 2007 and 2010. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Changing What Is Pasted in a Dialog Box.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Copying Subtotals

If you have added subtotals to your worksheet data, you might want to copy those subtotals somewhere else. This is easy to do ...

Discover More

Limitations On Finding Characters

When you search for information in a worksheet, you expect Excel to return results that make sense. If you don't get a search ...

Discover More

Turning the Legend On and Off

When you create a chart in Excel, the program may automatically add a legend that explains the contents of the chart. In some ...

Discover More

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

MORE WORDTIPS (RIBBON)

Setting the Left Indent of a Paragraph in a Macro

When using a macro to format text, you can set all sorts of attributes for paragraphs or individual characters. On attribute ...

Discover More

Passing a Data File Name via Command Line to a Macro

Using the command line to pass paramaters to a program is a common occurrence. Using the command line to pass parameters to a ...

Discover More

Can't Edit Macros

Load up documents created on older versions of Word, and you may find that you can't edit the macros you are used to using. ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is one more than 2?

2012-07-18 23:48:56

Ihor Prociuk

I'd like to thank Michael Avidan, Dave Pettit, and Ron Solecki who provided information on this tip. It's exactly what I was looking for.


Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share