Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Using Duplex Printing.

Using Duplex Printing

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 23, 2015)

8

Some printers support duplexing, meaning that they allow printing on both sides of a piece of paper. Being able to print on both sides depends on what type of printer you have set as your default printer. For instance, an HP OfficeJet Pro L7780 prints duplex but other models of HP printers may not offer this as an option.

Assuming that you have a printer that supports duplexing and that you have a printer driver that supports it, you can turn it on by following these steps if you are using Word 2007:

  1. Press Ctrl+P. Word displays the Print dialog box.
  2. From the list of available printers, select the printer on which you want the document printed.
  3. Click on the Properties button. This displays a Properties dialog box for the printer you selected.
  4. Select the Paper tab, then click the More Options button.
  5. Change the Duplex Printing option to either Flip on Long Edge or Flip on Short Edge, depending on how you want your document printed.
  6. Close the dialog boxes and print your document.

If you are using Word 2010 or Word 2013, the steps to set printing options are changed around quite a bit. Follow these steps, instead:

  1. Press Ctrl+P. Word displays the File tab of the ribbon, with the Print option selected at the left.
  2. From the list of available printers, select the printer on which you want the document printed.
  3. Click on the Printer Properties link, located just under the place where you specify a printer. Word displays a Properties dialog box for the printer you selected.
  4. Select the Paper tab, then click the More Options button.
  5. Change the Duplex Printing option to either Flip on Long Edge or Flip on Short Edge, depending on how you want your document printed.
  6. Close the dialog boxes and print your document.

Again, these steps will vary based on the printer you are using. You may need to look around in the printer's Properties dialog box to see where the actual control for duplexing is located. (Another good place to look is on the Finishing tab, if such a tab exists in your printer's Properties dialog box.)

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (9724) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Using Duplex Printing.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 7 + 7?

2015-12-19 05:41:02

David Goldberg

Allen,

Thanks for the ongoing tips- much appreciated.
As for the duplex/multiple pages tips they omit one vital (for me) aspect. The ability to print miniature books, either 4 or 8 pages per single sheet. As an editor I occasionally have a client that wants a proof in actual numbered page format, but scaled down to either softcover size (5.5" x 8.5") or even smaller, yielding pages 4.25" x 5.5". The former produces 4 pages (properly numbered on each side) that stack correctly when cut. The latter produces 8 pages from a single sheet.

Has the algorithm for entering page numbers in the above cases already been solved without anyone letting me know where the results are? Or am I among the few who have successfully printed such miniature books, but as yet have failed to announce it to the world? It has been a frustrating, but rewarding experiment in trial & error data entry, along with having to enter apparently contradictory page formatting or paper handling information in WORD 2010 in order to make margins come out correctly.

Being able to do this makes for a huge saving in paper- and postage. It also gives clients a preview that they can carry in jacket or cargo pants pocket. However, it is quite time consuming, and isn't something I do as a normal part of an editing package for a manuscript of book length.

Any words from the master on this point?

Dave


2015-05-24 22:20:45

VINCENT DE PAUL

Good


2015-05-24 20:06:14

Tony

Think of a 12 month calendar printed double sided on 6 pages.

The pages are bound along the top edge and at the end of January you flip the page upward to see February behind it.

Books are bound along the left edge and you flip your page leftward to see the next page behind it.

The choice you make determines if the print on the back of the page needs to be upside down or same as the front of the page.


2015-05-24 10:42:13

Marcia

Thank you, Roger and Chris. That is so logical, and it probably would have taken me a couple more years to figure it out.


2015-05-23 17:27:44

Chris

Imagine your pages are bound together to form a booklet. Are they bound along the long edge of the paper (as in portrait orientation) or along the short edge (as in landscape orientation)? That is the edge to flip on.


2015-05-23 14:54:12

Mary

May I know the difference between flipping on the long edge or flipping on the short edge.
Thanks.


2015-05-23 09:17:01

Roger Fulk

Flip on long edge is best when trying to print a regular double-sided document on portrait orientation whereas flip on long edge is best for printing documents on landscape orientation double-sided.


2015-05-23 07:59:46

Marcia

I have yet to figure out whether I should be choosing flip on long edge or flip on short edge. It's a guessing game for me. How are you supposed to determine which edge?

Thanks.


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