Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Searching and Replacing Graphics.

Searching and Replacing Graphics

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 20, 2019)

3

Word allows you to search not just for text, but also for special characters that normally do not print. One of these special characters is a marker indicating where a picture is inserted in your document. To search for graphics, follow these steps:

  1. Press Ctrl+H. Word displays the Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.
  2. Click the Find tab.
  3. Click on the More button, if it is available. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The expanded Find tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

  5. Make sure the Find What box is empty and the cursor is located in the box.
  6. Click on Special, then choose Graphic. Word inserts ^g in the Find What box.
  7. Set other searching parameters, as desired.
  8. Click on Find Next.

Unfortunately, while you can search for graphics, you cannot easily replace one graphic with another. There is a way to work around this, however. You can replace one graphic with another by following these steps:

  1. Click on the new graphic; the one you want to serve as a replacement for the old graphics.
  2. Press Ctrl+C. Word copies the graphic to the Clipboard.
  3. Press Ctrl+H. Word displays the Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.
  4. Click on the More button, if it is available. (See Figure 2.)
  5. Figure 2. The expanded Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

  6. Make sure the Find What box is empty and the cursor is located in the box.
  7. Click on Special, then choose Graphic. Word inserts ^g in the Find What box.
  8. Make sure the Replace With box is empty and the cursor is located in the box.
  9. Click on Special, then choose Clipboard Contents. Word insert ^c in the Replace With box.
  10. Click on the Replace All button.
  11. When the replacements are complete, click on Cancel.

If the graphic you copied in step 2 was originally inserted with the "Link to File" option selected, the graphic inserted by the replace command will also have this attribute. Likewise, if you resize the graphic before performing these steps, the graphic inserted by the replace command will retain the dimensions of the resized graphic.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (13276) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Searching and Replacing Graphics.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Unwanted Graph Paper Effect

When you open a document or start to use Word, do you see a background that looks like graph paper? It could be because ...

Discover More

Resetting Page Setup

If you ever open a workbook and find that your carefully crafted worksheets no longer print on the number of pages you ...

Discover More

Understanding Font Styles

Fonts, by default, come with one or more styles that define variations of how that font is displayed in your document. ...

Discover More

Do More in Less Time! Are you ready to harness the full power of Word 2013 to create professional documents? In this comprehensive guide you'll learn the skills and techniques for efficiently building the documents you need for your professional and your personal life. Check out Word 2013 In Depth today!

More WordTips (ribbon)

Rotating Fractions in a Text Box

Rotating graphics in Word is not always straight-forward, but it can be done. This tip examines a special need to ...

Discover More

Gradient Prints as Stripes

When you print a graphic that includes a gradient, you may not get exactly the output you expect. This tip examines two ...

Discover More

Saving Embedded Images to Individual Files

Word has long allowed you to embed pictures or images in the documents you create. What if you want to get those pictures ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 4 + 8?

2019-10-14 16:10:05

Denice

Hello,

I recently used this method in my Word 2016 document. However, all but one image was replaced with my new image. I found out that the image that was not replaced had a text wrapping of top and bottom. All of the other images were inline with text. Does this method only work with in line images? Or must the replacement image have the same text wrapping as the images in the document?

Thank you

Denice


2016-08-12 02:48:36

Katrina

Hi,

Is there a way of finding and replacing just selected images on a file and not all of them?

Thanks.


2015-07-31 20:52:14

J Tessier

Is there a way to find a graphic in a word doc by name (first need to be able to tell what word is referencing the graphic as, as well). I want to find all "New" graphics and remove them and mark my new sections as new. Let me know if you have a suggestion. Thanks!


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the ribbon interface (Word 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.