Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007 and 2010. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Copying Found Items to a New Document.

Copying Found Items to a New Document

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 1, 2017)

5

Robert notes that Word allows him to locate and highlight all the instances of an item that he enters in the Find dialog box. He wonders if, from that point, there is some way he can select all the highlighted instances so that he can copy and paste them into a new document.

Copying individual items that are found is easy?all you need to do is have the source and target documents open, find what you want in the source document, copy it to the Clipboard, and then paste it into the target document. Copying a bunch of found items at once is a bit trickier, however. Here's how to do it:

  1. Make sure you have the source and target documents both open, with the source document active.
  2. Display the Find tab of the Find and Replace dialog box. (See Figure 1.) (In Word 2007 just press Ctrl+F. In Word 2010 display the Home tab of the ribbon, click the down-arrow next to the Find tool, and then click Advanced Find.)
  3. Figure 1. The Find tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

  4. In the Find What box enter what you want to search for.
  5. Set any other parameters you desire for your search.
  6. Click the Find In drop-down list and select Main Document. Word selects, within the main document, all the matches it found.
  7. Click the title bar of your source document. This moves focus from the Find and Replace dialog box to the document itself, and all the selected items remain selected.
  8. Press Ctrl+C. This copies all the selected items to the Clipboard.
  9. Switch to the target document.
  10. Press Ctrl+V. Word pastes the Clipboard contents (all the matched information) into the target document.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (12391) applies to Microsoft Word 2007 and 2010. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Copying Found Items to a New Document.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is eight minus 3?

2017-05-10 12:07:54

Cayce

This is good info to know and got me part way to my slightly different scenario.

I want to select fields that have the words "CustomerName" associated with them. I need to convert them to plain text AND I need to highlight them in blue. I succeeded in getting them to plain text. The replace dialog offers highlight as a choice, but it's yellow. We use different highlight colors to mean different things to users, so I need blue. Is there a way to force Word to apply blue highlighting? If this requires a macro, what is the construction?


2013-01-02 11:58:52

Jennifer Thomas

You are right, David - it's a good shortcut to incorporate in a macro.

So, for example, you could find each instance of the word 'price' and select a range of text that follows it to copy a list of prices.


2012-12-31 10:52:00

David Powell

I'm guessing this is only useful if the search involves wildcards, or word forms, because otherwise the result is a list of 'n' identical strings, if the source document contained the string 'n' times. Now what would be really useful is if the surrounding context of each occurrence could be captured, for instance the word, and the sentence the word occurred in.


2012-12-30 22:39:06

Juan

Very interesting, it's curious


2012-12-30 10:05:32

Surendera M. Bhanot

Very tricky to fool the word. Ilike it.


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