Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Wrapping Text Around a Graphic.

Wrapping Text Around a Graphic

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 28, 2017)

1

After you insert a picture in your document, you can control how surrounding text flows around it. You can either turn wrapping off or you can cause Word to flow text around the image. To control text wrapping for a graphic, follow these steps:

  1. Insert your graphic as you normally would.
  2. Right-click your mouse on the graphic. Word displays a Context menu.
  3. Hover the mouse over the Text Wrapping option (Word 2007) or the Wrap Text option (Word 2010, Word 2013, and Word 2016). Word shows you several different ways you can have text wrap around the graphic.
  4. Select a method of text wrapping from those presented.

Once you have selected a wrapping method, you can modify the wrapping points using the techniques described in other WordTips. (Modifying the wrapping points allows you to get text very close to your image, including on top of it, if desired.)

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (11840) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Wrapping Text Around a Graphic.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is two minus 0?

2017-03-25 09:58:42

David Lorenzini

Allen, When I was tasked by a publisher to prepare a document for publication, I was asked not to allow hyphenation with less than three letters at the end or the beginning of a line. My method was to create a macro that cancelled checking the offending word, represented by the following macro:

Sub DlRemHyphenation()
' Select word from which to remove hyphenation
' Used to eliminate any part of a hyphenated word with less than 3 letters
' Shortcut = Alt+H
Selection.LanguageID = wdEnglishUS
Selection.NoProofing = True
Application.CheckLanguage = False
End Sub

Example: ad-
vice. or excit-
ed.

This has worked well for over a decade, but the only problem is that I have to visually search for the offending word. I've always wanted to ask you how can I find each hyphen with two only two characters separated by an automatic hyphen so I can run the macro, perhaps combining both operations in one macro. However, I was not able to find the symbol that Word uses for this automatic macro. Is there a way to do that?


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