Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007 and 2010. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Curving Text Around the Edge of a CD.

Curving Text Around the Edge of a CD

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 19, 2017)

3

Recent years has seen the growth of people using CD-ROM burners to create music or data CDs for a variety of purposes. You may want to use Word to help create a label for your CDs. You may want to use Word to place curved text around the outer rim of the label.

Word doesn't have a native ability to place text along a curved path, which means you need to use a program other than Word to accomplish the task. There are numerous graphics programs on the market that allow you to easily place any text you like along a curved path. You could either create the entire CD label in the graphics program, or you could create a graphic for the curved text, and then use that graphic within Word.

The best solution, however, may be to use a specialized program designed for creating CD labels. There are any number of them on the market. If you use Roxio's Easy Media Creator (popular CD and DVD recording software), there is CD labeling software included. And, yes, the software will handle curved text along the rim of a label.

In a semi-related side note, it is interesting that many people complain about the way in which Word's size and complexity has increased over the years. Yet many of the same people continue to bemoan the lack of specialized features, such as fitting text to a curve for CD labels. Isn't life ironic?

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (10308) applies to Microsoft Word 2007 and 2010. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Curving Text Around the Edge of a CD.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 8Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 7 - 2?

2017-07-19 11:28:37

Thomas Redd

Woops, my pictures all disappeared. If you want the document with pictures, contact me at thomasredd@yahoo.com


2017-07-19 11:26:15

Thomas Redd

Wrap Text Around A Circle Or Other Shape

Applies To: Excel 2016 Word 2016 Outlook 2016 PowerPoint 2016 Project Professional 2016 Excel 2013 Word 2013 Outlook 2013 PowerPoint 2013 Project Professional 2013 Project Standard 2013 Project Standard 2016 More... Less
You can use WordArt with a Transform text effect to partially curve or bend text around a shape. If you want the text to circle the shape, you can also do this, but it’s a little bit more work. You can also insert WordArt multiple times to wrap text around shapes with straight edges.


Tip: If you need very precise control or are creating a complex combination of shapes and text, you’ll want to use a third-party drawing or graphics program to arc the text around your shape and then copy and paste it into your Office document.
1. Click Insert > WordArt, and pick the WordArt style you want.

Note: The WordArt icon is located in the Text group, and it may appear different depending on the program you're using and the size of your screen. Look for one of these icons:

2. With the WordArt placeholder text highlighted, enter your own text.
3. Select your WordArt text.

Drawing Tools will appear above the Format tab.
4. On the Drawing Tools Format tab, in the WordArt Styles group, click Text Effects >Transform and pick the look you want.

Note: Depending on your screen size, you might only see the icons for WordArt Styles.

If you want your text to completely circle your shape, under Follow Path pick Circle, and then click and drag any of the sizing handles until your WordArt is the shape you want.

Tip: When you have the WordArt and shape positioned the way you want, group them so you can move or copy them as a single shape.
If you want to wrap text around a shape that has straight edges, such as a rectangle, insert WordArt for each edge. In this example, WordArt is inserted four times, one for each side of the shape.

You can control the angle of your WordArt text in relation to your shape with precision by using the Rotate tool.


2017-07-19 05:47:25

DKR

Or you simply use "WordArts" which in WORD2016 are available via INSERT > TEXT group > WordArt and allow - among other effects - arching text.


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