Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007 and 2010. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Updating Calculated Fields in a Form.

Updating Calculated Fields in a Form

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 27, 2013)

1

Word allows you to create special forms that rely on fields for the gathering of information. These forms can be protected so that text outside of the form fields cannot be modified by users. Other issues of WordTips have discussed ways in which forms can be created.

When you create a form, there are times you may need to have Word update the contents of calculated fields within the form. If you select the Update Fields Before Printing check box in the Display options of the Word Options dialog box, the fields are calculated automatically when a document is printed. But what if you don't want to print the entire document and waste paper just to see what the outcome of the calculations are?

The solution is to create a simple macro and assign the macro to the Quick Access toolbar. The following macro will do just fine:

Sub UpdateFields()
    Dim rngStory As Range
         For Each rngStory In ActiveDocument.StoryRanges
              rngStory.Fields.Update
         Next rngStory
End Sub

It is important that the macro be added to the Quick Access toolbar because a protected form doesn't allow access to macros in other ways.

This approach, of course, requires that the user remember to click on the button to refresh all the fields. If you prefer, you could assign the macro to the OnExit event of any form field. Thus, whenever the field was "exited," the macro would be executed. One WordTips subscriber also suggested the following macro as an OnExit macro to update fields:

Sub UpdateRefsInForm()
    Application.ScreenUpdating = False
    If ActiveWindow.View.Type = wdPrintView Then
        ActiveWindow.ActivePane.View.Type = wdNormalView
    Else
        ActiveWindow.View.Type = wdPrintView
    End If
    If ActiveWindow.ActivePane.View.Type = wdNormalView Then
        ActiveWindow.ActivePane.View.Type = wdPrintView
    Else
        ActiveWindow.ActivePane.View.Type = wdNormalView
    End If
End Sub

This macro is rather clever, in that all it does is switch from whatever view you are in (Draft/Normal or Print Layout view) to the other view, and then back again. This change in the view mode forces Word to update the fields.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (9628) applies to Microsoft Word 2007 and 2010. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Updating Calculated Fields in a Form.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 8Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is eight minus 3?

2016-01-31 20:09:33

Kelvin

Hi,
I came to this site because my calculation field would not update after entering the necessary data.
I realized, after some trying that a more elegant method may be to simply select "calculate on exit", in the properties of the fields that you would enter the required figures. I find that the calculation fields then performs the calculations immediately.


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