Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007 and 2010. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Controlling Repagination in Macros.

Controlling Repagination in Macros

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 7, 2013)

1

Ken asked if there is a way to turn off automatic repagination of a Word document while a macro is running. It turns out, in fact, that there are two ways you can handle this.

The first method is use the Pagination property of the Options object. You can set this property to either True or False, as follows:

Options.Pagination = False

This property is the same as setting the Enable Background Repagination option in the General sectiono f the Advanced options (in the Word Options dialog box). If the property is set to False, then Word does not perform any background repagination. You can later set the property to True to turn the feature back on.

The second method for handling automatic repagination is to simply turn off screen updating. If your macro does quite a bit of slicing and dicing on the document, this is always a good idea, anyway, as it stops Word from trying to update the display. In some cases, the speed improvement for your macro can be dramatic if you turn off screen updating. You control screen updating in this manner:

Application.ScreenUpdating = False

Again, the ScreenUpdating property can be set to either True or False. If set to False, screen updating is turned off. If you turn it off, you should always set ScreenUpdating to True before ending your macro.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (9233) applies to Microsoft Word 2007 and 2010. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Controlling Repagination in Macros.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Adjusting Spell Check for Internet Addresses

When you check the spelling of worksheet data, you may want to spell checker to either ignore or check Internet addresses ...

Discover More

Displaying Quick Document Statistics

Need to see how many pages, words, paragraphs, or lines are in your document? Word makes it easy to retrieve such ...

Discover More

Batch Template Changes

Changing the template associated with a couple of documents is easy, but what if a whole directory needs to be changed? These ...

Discover More

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

More WordTips (ribbon)

Detecting if the Insertion Point is Inside a Bookmark

When processing a document using a macro, you may need to know if the insertion point is within a bookmark or not. This is ...

Discover More

Determining the Number of Paragraphs in a Document

When using a macro to process a document in some way, you often need to know the number of paragraphs in the document. (This ...

Discover More

Aligning Paragraphs in a Macro

Using a macro to format your document (or portions of your document) is not all that uncommon. If you want your macro to ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 8Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 4 + 7?

2014-05-14 11:38:26

Chris Canada

Hello Allen,

I wanted to let you know your tip above helped significantly in an issue we were having. We were turning off pagination when assembling the document from separate RTF files and then turning it on again before document load. This seems to have caused an increase in elapsed time to open the document with each new document. We use Word to edit medical cases and transcription occurs in each case.) Removing the pagination setting made the elapsed time at least constant.

Our setup is rather interesting. We have a custom ribbon for call backs to our application that uses some XML in a dotm file and some ini info from the application. The settings are split due to variances between cases. We have a macro that assembles the document to be displayed. The document is assembled from several RTF documents that contain medical detail.

What I'm seeing happen is most of the macro takes less than a second to run. The creation of the custom ribbon kicks off and seems to halt everything for 15 seconds. After the 15 seconds the macro completes and returns control to the application which then opens the assembled document.

My question to you is, have you seen anything like this?

Thank you for taking the time to read my post and I hope to hear from you.

Chris


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the ribbon interface (Word 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.