Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007 and 2010. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Quickly Formatting Footers in Documents with Many Sections.

Quickly Formatting Footers in Documents with Many Sections

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 8, 2012)

2

Jake has a document that is created automatically by a program other than Word. The document has many pages in it, but each page is created as a separate section. Jake is looking for a way to quickly format the document so that the headers and footers are the same, beginning with the second section of the document. (The first page, which is also its own section, contains a cover sheet.)

You can make the necessary changes manually by following these steps:

  1. Press Ctrl+Home to go to the beginning of your document.
  2. Display the Insert tab of the ribbon.
  3. In the Header & Footer group, click either Header or Footer, depending on which one you want to change. Word displays a drop-down list of options.
  4. Click Edit Header or Edit Footer, depending on which tool you clicked in step 3. Word displays the header or footer along with the Design tab of the ribbon.
  5. Click the Next Section tool. Word displays the header or footer for the second section of the document.
  6. Make changes to the header or footer so it looks like you want it to look.
  7. Click the Next Section tool. This displays the header for the next (third) section of the document.
  8. Click the Link to Previous tool. You'll see a dialog box asking if you want to delete this header and link to the previous section. Click Yes.
  9. Repeat steps 7 and 8 until you work through all the headers in the document.
  10. On the Design tab of the ribbon click on Close Header and Footer.

If you have quite a few headers in your document, these steps can take a while to perform. You'll also need to perform them for all the footers in the document. (The only caveat is that you must switch to display the footers either before or after step 3.) If you have to routinely do this with many documents, then the process becomes even more tedious.

The solution for the tedium is to create a macro that will do the necessary changes for you. Consider the following macro:

Sub MakeSame()
    Dim J As Integer
    Dim K As Integer

    If ActiveDocument.Sections.Count > 2 Then
        For J = 3 To ActiveDocument.Sections.Count
            For K = 1 To ActiveDocument.Sections(J).Headers.Count
                ActiveDocument.Sections(J).Headers(K).LinkToPrevious = True
            Next K
            For K = 1 To ActiveDocument.Sections(J).Footers.Count
                ActiveDocument.Sections(J).Footers(K).LinkToPrevious = True
            Next K
        Next J
    End If
End Sub

The macro checks to see if there are at least three sections in the document. If there are, then it begins to make changes starting with the third section. It steps through all the headers and footers for each section, making sure that they are set to be the same as the previous section.

Once you are done running this macro, just edit the header or footer for the second section and make sure it is set the way you want.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (7541) applies to Microsoft Word 2007 and 2010. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Quickly Formatting Footers in Documents with Many Sections.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Storing AutoText Entries with a Document

AutoText entries can provide quite a bit of flexibility and power in a document. If you want to share those entries with ...

Discover More

Using Manual Line Breaks with Justified Paragraphs

If you use justified paragraphs, you know that if you press Shift+Enter, it can lead to some odd spacing between words ...

Discover More

Using a Standard Format in a Suggested File Name

Many companies (and some individuals) use specific formats for naming their documents. If you want Word to recognize your ...

Discover More

The First and Last Word on Word! Bestselling For Dummies author Dan Gookin puts his usual fun and friendly candor back to work to show you how to navigate Word 2013. Spend more time working and less time trying to figure it all out! Check out Word 2013 For Dummies today!

More WordTips (ribbon)

Copying Headers and Footers

Need to get headers and footers from one document to another? You can use the steps in this tip to help make quick work ...

Discover More

Paragraph Numbers in Headers or Footers

If your documents routinely use numbered paragraphs, you may want to place the number of the page's first paragraph in ...

Discover More

Putting Document Names in Headers or Footers

Want to include the file name of a document on the printed copy without rearranging the layout? You can use a header or ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is nine minus 4?

2015-06-08 09:45:23

KL

Nice tip, thanks!


2013-07-25 10:51:27

Thierry

Thanks for the macro. Very useful!


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the ribbon interface (Word 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.