Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Printing Style Sheets.

Printing Style Sheets

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 26, 2017)

3

In your permanent documentation for a file, you may wish to print a record of the style sheet you used. Word allows you to do this quite easily. Simply follow these steps:

  1. Press Ctrl+P to open the Print settings screen. (Ctrl+P in Word 2007 displays the Print dialog box.)
  2. Using the first drop-down control under the Settings heading, choose Styles. (This option is within the Document Properties group, visible after expanding the drop-down list.)
  3. Click on Print.

The resultant style sheet is not terribly pretty, but it provides the information you may need to understand (at a later date) the styles you used in developing your document.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (4272) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Printing Style Sheets.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is one minus 1?

2017-08-30 18:52:35

David Gray

I may indeed still have it, but that project came and went many years ago, and all of its code went into an archive., which means that it's on either a DVD or in an online ZIP archive. Since I was thinking the other day that I'd like to resurrect it for a different use case, I've made myself a note to look for it this weekend. If I find it, I'll post a copy here.


2017-08-29 07:43:17

Paul Hanson

You don't have that macro handy do you? Sounds pretty slick!


2017-08-28 15:12:13

David Gray

Presumably, this feature came about in Word 2007, because I don't remember seeing it in previous versions. One time, when I was still using Word 2002 (a. k. a. Word XP), I needed something similar, and resorted to creating a macro that generated a similar report, although I made mine in the form of a table, and I labeled each row with the style name, set in the style, rendered in that style. The resulting document became an artifact of the project for which I developed that template.


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