Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Word in Microsoft 365. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Aligning Positive and Negative Whole Numbers in a Column.

Aligning Positive and Negative Whole Numbers in a Column

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 11, 2021)

1

Peggy described a situation where she has a series of whole numbers in a table column. The negative numbers have parentheses around them, such as (2,345). Peggy is looking for a way to align the positive and negative whole numbers in a way that allows for an "implied" right parenthesis to the right of positive numbers.

One solution, if you don't have many negative numbers, is to add a right parenthesis to the positive numbers and then simply format it as white text. It will take space in the document but be invisible on the printout.

If you have many such numbers, however, then you should consider adding decimal tabs to the column. Follow these steps:

  1. Select the column containing the numbers.
  2. Make sure the column is left justified. (Display the Home tab of the ribbon and, in the Paragraph group, click the Align Left tool.)
  3. Repeatedly click the tab indicator at the left side of the Ruler until you see the symbol for a decimal tab. (It is the only symbol that has a decimal point in it.)
  4. Click on the Ruler in the area just above the selected column.
  5. Click and drag the newly added tab stop to its final position.

That's it; the numbers should align properly in the column. Notice that a decimal tab is used, even though there are no decimal points in the column. (Whole numbers have no decimal points.) Word still aligns the numbers correctly, assuming the existence of an implied decimal point. It even recognizes parentheses around a number as a negative sign and aligns the numbers accordingly.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (103) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Word in Microsoft 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Aligning Positive and Negative Whole Numbers in a Column.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 1 + 3?

2021-12-13 17:38:32

Caran

I advise caution with putting characters in white that are intended to be hidden. Even though they won't show up when printing this document, it's possible that the data could be copied and pasted to another document. If that character attribute is lost when pasted into a new document, you will have the oddity of a closing parenthesis on positive numbers in the new document.


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