Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Determining if Overtype Mode is Active.

Determining if Overtype Mode is Active

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 4, 2014)

1

If you are using a macro that inserts text in a document, you might want to determine if the overtype mode is active. This is the typing mode that results in every keypress replacing an existing character in the file. If you don't check for this, your macro could have undesired results.

The status of overtype is controlled, oddly enough, by the OverType property of the Options object. If the property is True, then overtype mode is active; if it is False, then it is not turned on. The following line of VBA macro code checks the status of the overtype mode and turns it off if it is on.

If Options.OverType Then Options.OverType = False

Note:

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WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (13266) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Determining if Overtype Mode is Active.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is nine more than 6?

2014-10-06 09:56:15

Glenn Case

While the tip will achieve the purpose stated, it will also likely result in some user frustration if the macro resets an option the user has selected. A good practice is to save the state of the option, and reset it at the end of the macro:

Sub XYZ()
Dim OTMode as Boolean
OTMode = Options.OverType
If OTMode Then Options.OverType = False

*** Your code here


Options.Overtype = OTMode
End Sub


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