Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Combining Word Documents.

Combining Word Documents

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 14, 2014)

1

Word provides a very easy way to combine documents, without the typical cut-and-paste routine. This is great for boilerplate text in your document. All you need to do is use the INCLUDETEXT field within a document. Follow these steps:

  1. Insert a pair of field braces by pressing Ctrl+F9.
  2. Within the field braces type INCLUDETEXT, followed by a space and the name of the document you want to include. Make sure you surround the document name with quote marks. For instance, if I wanted to include MyFile.Doc, I my field would look as follows:
  3.      { INCLUDETEXT "MyFile.Doc" }
    
  4. Press F9 to update the field.

At the point, the specified file should appear within your document. If it doesn't (for instance, if you get an error message), then make sure you typed the document name correctly, and that you included a full path name. (You must include the full path name if the document is in a directory different from the one in which the current document is located.)

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (13137) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Combining Word Documents.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 7 - 2?

2014-11-26 10:05:57

John McMullen

What if you want to iterate over all the files in a folder (chapter01.docx, chapter02.docx, and so on) to create a giant file for printing? I was sure I had seen that tip somewhere, but darned if I can find it.

Because that's just what I want to do, now.


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