Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Starting Chapters on Odd-Numbered Pages.

Starting Chapters on Odd-Numbered Pages

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 4, 2018)

5

One of the formatting features of Word allows you to force your headings (if you use styles) to begin on a new page. What if you want the heading to begin on an odd-numbered page, however? You can insert section breaks that force the next section to start on an odd page, as has been discussed in other issues of WordTips. But what if you don't want to use section breaks?

Unfortunately, there is no automatic way to start a heading on an odd page, based solely on the formatting you apply to the heading. This means you will need to insert some sort of special indicator that tells Word you want to jump to an odd page. If you don't want to use section breaks, you can cleverly force Word to an odd page by using field codes. The following compound field will force an extra page break if the field occurs on an even page:

{IF {=MOD({PAGE},2)}}=0 "<page break>" ""}

When you are building this field structure, make sure you replace <page break> with an actual, physical page break. When Word encounters the field, it determines the current page number and divides it by 2. If the remainder is 0 (meaning this is an even-numbered page), then the page break is inserted, thereby forcing your text to the next odd-numbered page. If the remainder is 1 (meaning this is an odd-numbered page), then nothing is inserted.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (12601) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Starting Chapters on Odd-Numbered Pages.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 3 + 4?

2017-11-08 04:58:59

Patrick Verhaeghe

To Tom Redd: what you are suggesting is with section breaks. Tha is indeed the easiest way but not what they were looking for :-)


2016-07-13 05:50:01

Ondrej

I switched to field code view, added a new field, entered the above written code and then cut-pasted a page break into it instead of the <page break> text. When I switched back to normal view and right-clicked it to update the field, my MS Word 2010 completely hangs. I have to kill the process. So this solution sadly does not work for me.. I guess I'll have to go with the section breaks or do it manually..


2014-03-02 13:46:37

Tom Redd

There is a much easier way to accomplish this task. You simple need to insert the break that goes to even or odd pages which every you prefer.

have the curser where you want to go to the next page. Click the page layout tab. In the page set up group click breaks. At the bottom are two breaks that can be added. One breaks the page to the next even page, and the other breaks the page to the next odd page.


2014-03-01 18:40:18

synr

"I'd like to use this, Allen, but need more information. Where do I put this field code? And what do you mean by "actual, physical page break"? "


2014-02-22 13:13:59

Linda

Thanks for this great tip, Mr. Wyatt. I understand the concept of inserting field code to force chapter start, but was wondering where is the best place to insert the field code. Should it be inserted in the page header or in the actual page text?


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