Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Entering a Degree Sign.

Entering a Degree Sign

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 29, 2017)

8

Beverly knows that she can add a temperature degree symbol to her document by using the Symbol dialog box. She wonders, though, if there is a keyboard shortcut for adding the symbol. The shortcut would make typing much faster and easier.

When you display the Symbol dialog box and select the character you want to insert (in this case the degree symbol), you should see some information about the character at the bottom of the dialog box. In this case, you see the value 176 (the ASCII value for the degree symbol) or 00B0 (the Unicode value for the degree symbol, in hexadecimal). You should also see a shortcut for the symbol which is "Control+@, Space" (without the quote marks). This information provides two ways you can use the keyboard to enter the degree symbol.

The first way is to simply use the shortcut shown: Just press Ctrl+@ (remember that you need to hold down the Shift key to get the @ character) and then press the spacebar. Bingo! The degree symbol appears in your document.

You could also use the ASCII or Unicode values to enter the character. To use the ASCII value, just hold down the Alt key as you type 0176 on the numeric keypad. To use the Unicode value, type 00B0 (although you can leave off the leading zeroes) and then press Alt+X.

If you choose to go the route of using the Unicode value, you should understand that what you have before the code is important. If you have some other number immediately before the code (especially if you shorten the code to B0), Word gets confused because it can't tell if the preceding number is part of the code or not. The solution is to put a space before the code and then delete it afterward.

If you don't want to use one of these methods to enter the degree symbol, you could also create your own shortcut. Display the Symbol dialog box, select the degree symbol, and then click the Shortcut Key button. Word then lets you decide which shortcut you want to use.

Another approach is to create an AutoCorrect entry for the degree symbol. Follow these steps:

  1. Display the Word Options dialog box. (In Word 2007 click the Office button and then click Word Options. In Word 2010 display the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. At the left side of the dialog box click Proofing.
  3. Click the AutoCorrect Options button. Word displays the AutoCorrect tab of the AutoCorrect dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The AutoCorrect tab of the AutoCorrect dialog box.

  5. In the Replace box, enter a mnemonic you want to use, such as "<o>" (without the quote marks).
  6. With the insertion point in the With box, hold down the Alt key as you type 0176 on the numeric keypad..
  7. Click on Add. Your new AutoCorrect definition is added to those already maintained by Word.
  8. Click on OK.

Now, whenever you want a degree symbol all you need to do is type your mnemonic and when you press the spacebar Word expands it to your degree symbol.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (7719) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Entering a Degree Sign.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Limiting Lines in a Table Cell

When creating tables, Word automatically sets the size of the cells. But what if you want to make sure each cell is a certain ...

Discover More

Finding Rows with Values in Two Columns

When you use Excel to input and store information, you need to be concerned with whether the information meets your ...

Discover More

Understanding the If ... End If Structure

One of the powerful programming structures provided in VBA allows you to conditionally execute commands. The If ... End If ...

Discover More

Learning Made Easy! Quickly teach yourself how to format, publish, and share your content using Word 2013. With Step by Step, you set the pace, building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Check out Microsoft Word 2013 Step by Step today!

More WordTips (ribbon)

Turning Off Word's Second Guessing with Quote Marks

When you type quote marks in a document, Word normally changes them to Smart Quotes. They look better on a printout, but Word ...

Discover More

Inserting Foreign Characters

It is not unusual to need to insert foreign characters (often called diacritical marks) as part of your typing. Word provides ...

Discover More

Selecting an Entire Section

Documents can be subdivided into sections, with each of them formatted differently. If you want to select all the text in a ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 8 - 2?

2017-05-29 11:04:38

Julia

I can never find the degree stymbol when I want it so I enter the lower case o. Highlight it (Shift+back arrow) and in the Font section of the Word Ribbon select the bottom right arrow that expands the option (or Control D) and select the Superscript box.


2017-05-29 04:08:38

Joe Vincent

I find it simpler to type Alt 248 to produce the ° sign.


2015-11-15 00:47:44

MaryB

I have always usd alt248 for the degree sign. No wonder shortcuts are hard to remember when
2-many ways to do things. Think I will try the ctrl@for a while to see is any faster.

I used the same auto correct method for mmHg which I use very frequently for mm of mercury when measuring blood pressure. Called the auto correct bp


2015-04-15 00:14:28

Duane

I stand corrected, disregard my last post. The error was with me.


2015-04-15 00:10:05

Duane

Neither of these methods work as stated. There must be a crucial step missing some place.


2014-12-05 08:16:00

Surendera M. Bhanot

One can insert the Degree sign by typing the letter small 'o' (without quote), Select it by pressing <shift+back arrow key>,and press <Ctrl+Shift+=> simultaneously. the 'o' will be converted into degree sigh.


2014-12-04 08:27:03

Thomas Redd

In Word 2013, there is a simpler way to create a mnemonic for a symbol. Follow these steps:
1. Display the Symbol Box
and click the More button at the bottom. Then select the symbol you want.
2. At the bottom, click the Auto Correct button.
3. In the Replace box, enter a mnemonic you want to use, such as "<o>" (without the quote marks).
4. Click on OK.
Now, whenever you want that symbol you selected, all you need to do is type your mnemonic and when you press the spacebar Word expands it to your symbol.


2014-12-03 09:28:02

Tim S. Deputy

thanks for the great information.

Now, whenever you would like a degree sign all your necessitate to do is category your mnemonic and when you squash the spacebar Word expands it to your degree symbol.


Source: http://www.buydegree.net


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the ribbon interface (Word 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.