Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Word in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Writing a Macro from Scratch.

Writing a Macro from Scratch

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 11, 2018)

1

Many of the tips used in WordTips rely upon macros in order to run. Some readers may not know how to enter a macro from scratch in Word. There are actually two ways you can create macros. First you can record a macro, which is appropriate when you want to record a series of steps you perform quite often. The second method of creating a macro, writing one from scratch, is much more powerful.

To create a macro from scratch, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure the Developer tab of the ribbon is displayed.
  2. In the Code group, click Macros. Word displays the Macros dialog box. (You can also display the Macros dialog box by simply pressing Alt+F8.)
  3. Using the Macros In drop-down list (near the bottom of the dialog box), select where you want your new macro stored. Select Normal.dotm (Global Template) if you want your macro available in all documents; select a different template if you want the macro available only with that particular document template. You can even assign a macro to a specific document.
  4. In the Macro Name box, type a descriptive name you want assigned to the macro you are writing. (Make sure the name doesn't have any spaces in it.) Optionally, you can enter information in the Description box.
  5. Click on Create. The VBA Editor is started and you can write your macro.
  6. When you are through, close the macro window by selecting the Close and Return to Microsoft Word option from the File menu, or press Alt+Q.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the WordTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (6821) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Word in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Writing a Macro from Scratch.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is four less than 5?

2020-03-31 08:25:34

Pia

Hello,

I have to write a macro to change the branding and the structure of a word document (method of procedure - MOP) based on the following requirements:

1. We have a MOP document written in our company's template. The client, however, wants the same document in their company's format. So, we need to rebrand the document per the client company's template.

2. We also need to make changes to the placement of content. For example, in our document, there is a section called "Pre-installation Checks". The content from this section needs to go into a table in the Client's document. So, it means we need to make structural changes to the document.
There would be more such structural changes throughout the document. I can work on those if you can provide an example for one such change.

The idea here is for the engineers who are not very familiar with Word to work on these documents with just a click of the macros.

Could you please help with writing a macro for these two requirements?

Thank you!


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