Finding a Change in Typeface

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 16, 2017)

1

Derek needs a way to find, in a document, the next time the typeface (font name) changes. For instance, if the insertion point is within the middle of the document, he would like Word to let him know, starting at that point, where the next change occurs. Derek wonders if there is a way to accomplish such a task.

There is no built-in way to accomplish this task, though you may be able to visually tell when the typeface has changed. I can often tell by simply increasing the zoom factor for the document (say, to 200% or 250%) and then visually scanning the document to look for changes in appearance. Of course, this will depend on the visual disparity between the two adjacent fonts.

If you prefer a macro-based solution, you could create one that saves the typeface name at the current insertion point location and then steps through each remaining character of the document. If the typeface differs from the original one, then you can notify the user. Here is an example of such a macro:

Sub ChangeOfFont()
    Dim fntName As String
    Dim aRange As Range

    Set aRange = Selection.Range
    aRange.Collapse Direction:=wdCollapseStart
    aRange.MoveEnd Unit:=wdCharacter
    fntName = aRange.Font.Name
    Do
        aRange.MoveEnd Unit:=wdCharacter
        aRange.MoveStart Unit:=wdCharacter
    Loop Until aRange.Font.Name <> fntName Or _
      aRange.Bookmarks.Exists("\EndOfDoc")
    aRange.Select
    If aRange.Bookmarks.Exists("\EndOfDoc") Then
        MsgBox "End of document"
    Else
        MsgBox "Font change from " & fntName & " to " & aRange.Font.Name
    End If
End Sub

The majority of work is done in the Do loop, where each character's font is checked to see if it has changed. Note that the loop also checks to see if the end of the document is reached, at which point you would want the macro to stop.

Note:

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Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is four more than 0?

2018-01-08 20:13:21

Susan Uttendorfsky, Adirondack Editing

Great idea! Thank you. Sometimes the different font is clear (like TNR to Arial), but other times it's more subtle, especially if it's only a period or a comma.

I especially like that you dim your variables. Some other macro writers I sometimes get macros from don't, and then I have to go through the trouble of doing it. :)


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